If Death is Not the End…

My grandma died when she was 62 and that was way too early.

Our rides in her beat up old red car that we lovingly referred to as “the Klunker,” our hot summer evenings talking on her front porch, and our quick trips to the local restaurant with the best milkshakes in town… were all cut short by an insidious and dreadful disease called Alzheimer’s.

She would never get a chance to meet my beautiful wife or hold my kids in her arms.

Neither would my grandpa who died of cancer when he was 80.

When I held his hand as he lie asleep in his hospital bed just a couple of days before he passed, I thought about the countless nights I spent at his house, the smell of breakfast and pipe smoke each morning, his flat top haircut, and either a Bible on his lap or Andy Griffith on the television.

Some memories never fade.

But while there is immense joy in being able to remember all of the time we spent together, it is coupled with the haunting reminder that our lives have absolutely no power over death. Whether it is my grandma, my grandpa, me, or even you, our end is certain.

And that reality, our powerlessness to death, is one of utter sadness and despair, because death is our final ending.

So much for family and friends and relationships.
So much for our pursuits and endeavors.
So much for parties and celebrations and having friends over for dinner.
So much for art and music and creativity.
So much for sunsets and mountains and shooting stars.
So much for the smell of breakfast in the morning and sitting on front porches in the summer.

It all comes to a crushing, brutal, and inconsequential end in death.

And you can’t help but feel as if we have been short-changed somehow, like it all should have meant something.

All of this time on earth for absolutely nothing in the end… except for the assurance of death.

But if death is our end and our end is meaningless and inconsequential… then wouldn’t all things leading to that end be meaningless and inconsequential as well?

Said another way- if death is the end toward which all life is moving… then why does anything in our lives matter at all?  Why ascribe any purpose to it whatsoever? It is all death in the end anyway.  

Yet we live and breathe and act each day as if it matters, like it has some sort of importance or significance.  We ironically fight for life as if it is worth something, like it has meaning and value. We grieve when loved ones die. We treat cancer and search for the cure for AIDS and go to the family doctor and try to eat healthy… because we prefer life over death. We spend our time, energy, and resources protecting and defending life and standing for those who cannot defend themselves.

But why do this if it is all death in the end… and life is of no consequence?  Why do we even have a preference for life over death?  Why involve ourselves in any pursuit or endeavor while we are alive?  Why waste our time on anything at all?

Why should we paint and design and build? Why should we continue to create and imagine and dream?  Why play music and write stories and cry when there are happy endings in movies and plays if it all just tragically ends?

Why?

I think the answer is simple:  Death is not our end.  

And if death is not our end, and if there is actually a purpose toward which we are moving, then all things leading toward that purpose is full of meaning and is well worth our time.

That is precisely why the resurrection of Jesus Christ is so important for humanity… because it gives us hope and assurance that, while we were powerless against death, only God has the power to defeat it.  Therefore life, not death, is the purpose toward which we are moving and everything we do to that end is valuable.

That is the very foundation of faith.  It is the belief that God is working toward the renewal of all things, and by virtue of asking God to be the active and present center of our lives,  we begin participating in that renewal right now.  It is a life that looks like Jesus in everything we do.

And it is that reality, God’s power and victory over death demonstrated in Jesus Christ, which is the pinnacle of human happiness and joy… because life prevails and gives us meaning and purpose today.

Family and friends and relationships all matter.
Parties and celebrations and having friends over for dinner is a foretaste of how life will be one day.
Art and music and creativity is a reflection of what we were made to do and what we will continue to do at the renewal of all things.
Sunsets and mountains and shooting stars are a present glimpse of new creation when death is finally exhausted.
And yes, the smell of breakfast in the morning and sitting on front porches in the summer with everyone we love is just the beginning of how good life will be when Christ returns.

No more pain. No more tears. No more death. No more decay.

So live and breathe and act each day as if it matters, like it has some sort of importance or significance… because it does!

For in Christ’s resurrection… all things are made new…. even and especially you.

10 thoughts on “If Death is Not the End…

  1. So the only reason to live and do good things is to gain eternal life? Eternal life given to you from an almighty creator who demands you worship him or be punished with eternal torture?

    This takes morality completely off the table does it not? By abiding to these principles you are simply working to get yourself a ticket to paradise, correct?

    Tell me, Brandon, if death and decay were all that was promised in the end, if Christ just said “do these things because God said so”, would you live a life of debauchery and carelessness? I think I know the answer.

    I grew up Christian and very recently feel like I need answers to questions like this. Or maybe I don’t, either way I think I would enjoy the dialogue. As I become older I’m realizing if you step outside the curtain of religion for a minute things aren’t as scary as you may think. In fact, it’s a little like someone just took they’re foot off your throat.

    Like

    1. The reason we do good things, the reason we help people, the reason we love, the reason we fight against injustice is not to get into Heaven and have eternal life. We do these things because WE HAVE an eternal life in Heaven.

      I, too, needed to know the answers to the questions you wrote. I’ve been praying about it for a long time and in the past year, and especially the past 5 months, it became urgent that I find the answer. I found the answer- when I read your question.

      Like

  2. Hey C…

    Thanks for the response. I really appreciate your willingness to dialogue. I find that, many times, people are so rigid in their ideological positions that emotion and defensiveness can override any sort of civil and respectful conversation. So, to that end, thanks for your willingness to dialogue.

    Based on a few of the things you mentioned in your post, you and I share many similarities. I, too, have had (and continue to have) questions about everything I believe. I have found that asking questions, even and especially the hardest questions of faith, does not somehow diminish or undermine my faith. In my ways, asking tough questions has strengthened my faith. Because I am not satisfied, and all too unsettled, with cookie-cutter answers… I am pushed to keep seeking, asking, and knocking. It has been my personal experience that when I am asking, seeking, and knocking… my questions have been answered to my satisfaction, what I am looking for has been found, and many, many times… the door has been opened. I am a better man for it.

    I also admit that even though my faith is stronger today, because of my questioning everything… there were many dark days of frustration without answers. Ultimately there is a certain amount of unknowing that a person of faith has to be comfortable with. That notion doesn’t sit well with us nowadays, because we have information and knowledge at our fingertips with everything question we ask. However, the idea that we can know the answer to every single spiritual question is not realistic, because if we could then faith (hope in what we can’t see)… wouldn’t be faith at all. That’s not a cop out… that’s just reality. That doesn’t mean I stop asking questions. It just means that I am comfortable with a certain amount of tension created by my unknowing. I believe that there is room with faith and God to be in that space of unknowing, between the tension, yet still be faithful and hopeful.

    Another similarity it seems that you and I have is our view on how important it is to step “outside of the curtain of religion,” as you say. I am guessing that you have not read much of what I have written over the last decade. One consistent thing you would find in my writings is a significant disdain of religion (man-made constructs that inhibit or choke the way of Jesus through dogma, politicization, oppressive structure, etc.). That is one consistent message that I have trumpeted. It hasn’t just been a message about which I have written, it has been something I have tried to live and embody and help others see. I have found tremendous peace and life outside of religion and will be the first to agree with your assertion.

    So, I think that you are I are on solid footing as we work through a few issues that you brought up.

    What I will do is try to work through and provide some perspective on a line-by-line basis from your comment above. I am just shooting from the hip… so I may not answer everything as thoroughly as a one on one conversation… but here goes.

    You asked:

    “So the only reason to live and do good things is to gain eternal life?”

    My response:

    Again, I am assuming you haven’t read anything else I have written. For about eight years of my writing life I have been critiquing the predominant Evangelical narrative that has been beat into our American psyche for at least one hundred years. I am not a lone voice in the wilderness on this, as there are many others who offer an entirely different narrative of Christ and Christianity than mainstream Evangelicalism. These voices have not been as loud or vocal or political as those in Evangelicalism, however each day those number of voices (that offer this alternative narrative) is growing. And that is an exciting thing.

    So what is this alternative narrative and how does it relate to your first question?
    The traditional Evangelical narrative looked at life and salvation as transactional, i.e. I accept Jesus in order to go to Heaven (which is what I assume you mean by the phrase “eternal life”). Within this transactional mindset one makes a decision to accept or reject Jesus Christ and then receives his/her payment, either heaven or hell. That has been the primary message to a “lost world,” either accept or go to hell.

    Oddly enough, that wasn’t the message of Jesus (or the first church) at all. There was never any indication of a transactional faith. In fact, the primary message of Jesus was the Kingdom of God, which almost everyone of his parables describes. The message of the Kingdom of God was an invitation to take part in a present reality in which God becomes the center of everything in one’s life. And as one’s life is centered and oriented around God’s in-breaking presence into the world, a natural manifestation of “life to the fullest” and “good works” toward others” breaks out in one’s life.

    Said another way, as I take part in this present reality of God’s in-breaking Kingdom, or God’s in-breaking reign in and through my life, my heart changes. As a result, how I see the world changes, how I view other people changes, how I treat people and relationships and situations changes. As a consequence, the “good” I do in my life is not compulsory or obligatory. It is, rather, a manifestation of God working from the inside-out of my life.

    With this understanding, my “salvation” isn’t about accepting Jesus to get something (heaven)… it is an invitation to take part in something that God is already doing. That is what Jesus was talking about with his Kingdom message- that another reality (initiated by God and demonstrated by Jesus) has broken into this realm of existence (heaven and earth have begun to come together) in and through my life. That’s is what eternal life is. The eternal manifesting in my life. We will not be spirits going off to live in a spiritual, disembodied existence, but rather we embody the eternal presently in anticipation heaven and earth finally coming together as one. Again, salvation according to Jesus and the early church was NOT transactional… it was invitational (taking part presently in what God has initiated through Jesus. And that is a beautiful, beautiful thing.

    One question you may have at this point is, “Wait a second, that is a very different narrative than what the typical Evangelical church conveys, why don’t they share that same narrative you described?” That’s a great question… and the exact reason I wrote the book Unearthed: How Discovering the Kingdom of God Will Transform the Church and Change the World. It is a message completely lost on the majority of Christians.

    You asked:

    “Eternal life given to you from an almighty creator who demands you worship him or be punished with eternal torture?”

    My response:

    I think I understand what you are asking here. You are saying, in essence, “Accept me or go to hell.” Again, your question hints at the underlying Evangelical narrative of a transactional faith- Accept/heaven -or- Reject/Hell.
    I would say a couple of things about that.

    First, God never demands anything. God shows/demonstrates (through Jesus Christ) the best and highest way to live… and invites us to take part in that kind of life.

    Second, no matter who you are (Christian or not)… we all have the ability to presently bring heaven or hell on earth. Again, we can perpetuate the present order of life (anger, hatred, violence, disunity, dehumanization, etc.)… which is manifestation of our dis-union or separation from God (sin) and create hell on earth- or- we can manifest a different order (God’s reign) presently in and through our lives (self-sacrificial love, joy, peace, non-violence, unity, valuing all life, etc.). It is my belief that it is only through the resurrected Christ and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit that union with God (forgiveness of sin) is possible and life to the fullest is possible. Tragically, many people who call themselves Christians and who view their faith as a transaction in order to “get a ticket to heaven,” miss the point of what God is doing in the world through the real Body of Christ.

    Third, as far as hell goes, there is not unanimity within Christianity on what “hell” even is. It’s not heresy to say that… it’s just reality. Some say that it is the burning fire where the unrepentant go for eternity. This idea is known as Eternal Concious Torment. While it is the most popularized idea of the afterlife and has been used as a method of “saving souls,” it isn’t the the most biblical position.

    There are other schools of thought on the afterlife for the unrepentant. Some talk about annihilationism, which posits that as one chooses a path away from God, God actually lets that person go on their own chosen way to complete destruction and non-existence. In essence, a person can choose a path away from God and that, in and of itself, is judgment and away from Life (because there is only Life in God). There is quite a bit of biblical evidence for this position.

    There are those who believe in Christian Universalism, which is the idea that Christ completely defeated sin and death and that because of this accomplishment all things (including people) will be restored. There are some really compelling passages in the Bible that lend itself to this idea, but plenty of other passages that would make this a difficult to reconcile.

    Another position is Universalism, which basically says that everyone will be saved no matter which path they are on. The main difference between this position and Christian Universalism is that of Christ being the means through which all will be saved.

    So what’s the point of all this? Well, it’s to say that I would challenge your traditional assumptions about hell and that God is in the business of torturing people forever. I am sorry that the popularized idea of hell has tainted our view of God and Christianity. And, to tell you the truth… if it turns out that God is really like that… making people “burn” for eternity… then I want no part of that God. God would be sadistic and something of a Hitler… and it wouldn’t matter how “just” or “holy” God is… tormenting even the vilest offender for eternity is ridiculous.

    But the truth is that the perfect expression of God (God’s heart and God’s character) is found in Jesus. It is in Jesus where we find the heart of God- a God that goes to his death to demonstrate the lengths he will go in order to show you his love of friend and enemy alike. That is perfect grace and perfect mercy. That is the father I find in the story of the prodigal son. The father who is always standing there with open arms welcoming his sons and daughters home… ready to throw a party when they return. God is like the shepherd we find in the parable of the lost sheep… willing to go to great lengths to find a person and bring them back into the fold. God never takes away a person’s right to choose which path they want to take and never trumps a person’s free will… but is always there waiting with an invitation for all to come home.

    You asked:

    “This takes morality completely off the table does it not? By abiding to these principles you are simply working to get yourself a ticket to paradise, correct?”

    My response:

    I already answered this question with the first two responses… but I will say that I completely applaud your metaphor of the ticket to paradise. You are spot on. In fact, that is the exact same metaphor I used in my book Unearthed to make the same exact point!

    Faith is an active participation into that which we have been invited… into union/relationship with God. From that, again, an outward manifestation of life eternal flows. It isn’t what one does to receive something… it is what we become.

    “Tell me, Brandon, if death and decay were all that was promised in the end, if Christ just said “do these things because God said so”, would you live a life of debauchery and carelessness? I think I know the answer.”

    You have completely nailed it with your above question… and YES you do already know the answer! If death and decay was the ultimate end to everything… I would still follow the way of Christ because it leads to the fullest, most abundant, most loving existence possible. It is the most beautiful expression of life… because it is life as it was always intended to be (shalom).

    BUT… the fact that all of human history is heading toward (not destruction) but RENEWAL makes how we live presently that much sweeter and that much more hopeful. I have heard it described this way- We have the privilege and joy of experiencing presently how it will be in the future. In other words, because we know that heaven and earth are coming together in fullness one day and God’s dwelling place will be amongst us in a renewed and restored existence where we will be individually healed, relationally healed, and globally healed… we get the opportunity to begin living that way presently (right now today) in anticipation of what is to come in it’s fullness much later. And we have the opportunity to invite others into that today. That is the good news.

    You asked:

    “I grew up Christian and very recently feel like I need answers to questions like this. Or maybe I don’t, either way I think I would enjoy the dialogue. As I become older I’m realizing if you step outside the curtain of religion for a minute things aren’t as scary as you may think. In fact, it’s a little like someone just took they’re foot off your throat.”

    My response:

    I agree with your sentiment. Through all my asking, seeking, and knocking I am glad I finally discovered that treasure buried in the field. The God of mercy and grace that I find in Jesus doesn’t have his foot on my throat… he is inviting me (and you) to walk alongside him on the way to the big party.

    Grace and peace….

    Brandon

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    1. Brandon

      Firstly, thank you so much for taking time to respond in such a thoughtful and complete manner. I really appreciate it and never want to seem contentious or sarcastic toward you. You seem like very thoughtful, well spoken and intelligent person particularly on this subject. We are essentially the same age and (possibly)have a lot in common, I’m assuming of course, which is why I reached out to you. I apologize for the anonymity but I’m not ready to disclose publicly these things about myself although I do think the publicly visual discussion could be useful for more than just my own growth. Therefore I don’t mind doing it on your blog and I don’t object to you sharing it outside of this. In fact, I would love to hear what others have to say good, bad or indifferent.

      It’s taken a while for me to respond because I’ve gone through a lot of different emotions lately and it’s been difficult to pin down my thoughts.

      I have not read much of your work unfortunately but I will. Your ideals and beliefs described in your reply are pretty contemporary and deviate from many fundamental teachings. I should take some time and read up on your stuff for for the sake of conversation and continued shooting from the hip I’ll procrastinate that a little longer.

      You seem to be coming from the same place Rob Bell (someone else I should read more) is. However, I always feel like that particular belief set is revised and cherry picked a bit to satisfy what you (and Rob)find more appealing. Please correct me if I’m way off here.

      I do have questions, literally hundreds. I won’t start listing them but as I write please forgive me because I’m going to sound like a rambling fool sometimes. I’m not a published author (again, not being sarcastic). I’ll stick to some of the things in this discussion. What you call dark days I feel are transparent days. Looking back I have lived most of my life as a non-believer who reluctantly went through the motions to make my parents and community happy. I remember an experience at church camp when I was about 10 when I truly believed there was a guy who was tortured and murdered for my sins although I didn’t know what that meant or why an almighty God wouldn’t just be like “there, you’re forgiven”. Better yet, why even bother creating humans in the first place? I know now this was only the systematic pounding of religion in to my child brain and the longing for solidarity of the group I was in. I’ve felt a bit like an outcast or a “bad person” most of my life because of non-belief. I’m just now realizing thats completely unfair and unfair for me to perpetrate on my own children. They were born into a Christian-dominated country, that’s not their fault. Just like it’s not the fault of a child born in Iran into Islam.

      But, to get to a point, can you tell me why I NEED Jesus to make my life better? If religion didn’t exist I would still love my kids, my friends. I would get pleasure from helping people, playing sports, making love to my wife, ect. AND, I haven’t really believed for about 25 years and I absolutely have experienced unbelievable emotions. I am moral. I don’t need a sign from above to tell me this. I know the party line here is answers to 1) why are we here? 2)What happens when we die? But I’m not interested in those answers. I’ve already conceded to the evidence that shows it’s more likely we are just “here” and I still haven’t killed myself.

      You say filling in the gaps of unknown with God is good enough for you. What if that’s not good enough for me? I’d rather fill it with something other than the mythology handed down from the hills of 1920s Kentucky(no offense Kentuckians) where my ancestors are from. This is where I suppose I could adopt a set of beliefs like yours which seem to be modification of traditional ideology, using what sounds appealing to the contemporary crowd. But (assuming) these are just smiley versions of lessons taught from the bible which is wrought with craziness because it was written by dudes 1000s of years ago when it was ok murder someone on the spot for not agreeing with your religious views. We choose what sounds good out of this book but if it was written by God how can it not all be valid? I know these questions sound a bit silly to everyday Christians but when I took a step back and said “wait….it’s all complete bullshit” these questions suddenly make tons of sense.

      I really appreciate the dialogue and look forward to more

      Like

      1. Hey good to hear from you. Sorry about my delay i have been swamped. Here is some responses to you dialogue/questions.

        You said:

        “I have not read much of your work unfortunately but I will. Your ideals and beliefs described in your reply are pretty contemporary and deviate from many fundamental teachings. I should take some time and read up on your stuff for for the sake of conversation and continued shooting from the hip I’ll procrastinate that a little longer.

        You seem to be coming from the same place Rob Bell (someone else I should read more) is. However, I always feel like that particular belief set is revised and cherry picked a bit to satisfy what you (and Rob)find more appealing. Please correct me if I’m way off here.”

        My response:

        I haven’t read much of Rob Bell but I do know that many of the theologians and teachers he reads and respects are theologians and teachers I read and respect as well. I would say the unfortunate consequence of the fundamentalist evangelical movement in the United States is that it has traditionally been so loud and pervasive that many have grown up with that as their standard or foundation of Christianity. I believe it is for this reason that, when you hear an alternative narrative like I describe, it makes you think that somehow I have veered off the rails away from the “fundamental teachings” of the faith. I would push back quite vigorously at this assumption. What I describe are not contemporary notions at all. As I mentioned in my previous comment, there are movements and individuals who have advanced this message of the Kingdom of God, but who are not as vocal, who are not political, and who work peaceably behind the scenes to advance this Good News. I would point to theologians (and their books I that I recommend) such as NT Wright (Surprised by Hope) and Greg Boyd (Myth of a Christian Nation & Myth of a Christian Religion). Those books go a VERY long way to detach much of the accumulation that Christianity has littered on the movement of Jesus. Myth of a Christian Religion would be a fantastic jumping off point for a person who wants to cut through the crap and find out the essence of Jesus. What you will find with these theologians is that there isn’t any cherry picking that goes on with their material. Each have written about and wrestled with the very toughest topics of the faith. Another guy whom I have been listening to lately is an Anabaptist preacher from Canada named Bruxy Cavey. His church is called The Meeting House- A Church for People Who Aren’t Into Church. In fact, one of his recent teachings made me think of our conversations. The sermon is called Why Do Christians Think Everyone Should Follow Jesus? It’s like 30 minutes long and if you really need an abbreviated version then start at minute 11 (http://www.themeetinghouse.com/teaching/archives/2014/questioning-god/). I would listen to it through the Q&A and conclusion.

        You said:

        “I do have questions, literally hundreds. I won’t start listing them but as I write please forgive me because I’m going to sound like a rambling fool sometimes. I’m not a published author (again, not being sarcastic). I’ll stick to some of the things in this discussion. What you call dark days I feel are transparent days. Looking back I have lived most of my life as a non-believer who reluctantly went through the motions to make my parents and community happy. I remember an experience at church camp when I was about 10 when I truly believed there was a guy who was tortured and murdered for my sins although I didn’t know what that meant or why an almighty God wouldn’t just be like “there, you’re forgiven”. Better yet, why even bother creating humans in the first place? I know now this was only the systematic pounding of religion in to my child brain and the longing for solidarity of the group I was in. I’ve felt a bit like an outcast or a “bad person” most of my life because of non-belief. I’m just now realizing thats completely unfair and unfair for me to perpetrate on my own children. They were born into a Christian-dominated country, that’s not their fault. Just like it’s not the fault of a child born in Iran into Islam.”

        My response:

        I completely understand and agree. Whether you can accept this or not, it sounds like the theological framework in which you grew up was significantly off track and many, especially you, have paid the price for it. All I would ask is for you to listen to the podcast above as a starting point. I would equate it to a detox of sorts. Although what I have had to detox from pales in comparison, I have found profound liberation and joy in Jesus. Everything that Bruxy says in that sermon is what I would be typing to you.

        You said:

        “But, to get to a point, can you tell me why I NEED Jesus to make my life better? If religion didn’t exist I would still love my kids, my friends. I would get pleasure from helping people, playing sports, making love to my wife, ect. AND, I haven’t really believed for about 25 years and I absolutely have experienced unbelievable emotions. I am moral. I don’t need a sign from above to tell me this. I know the party line here is answers to 1) why are we here? 2)What happens when we die? But I’m not interested in those answers. I’ve already conceded to the evidence that shows it’s more likely we are just “here” and I still haven’t killed myself.”

        My response:

        The podcast above begins answering your questions. After you listen to it, we can dialogue more.

        You said:

        “You say filling in the gaps of unknown with God is good enough for you. What if that’s not good enough for me? I’d rather fill it with something other than the mythology handed down from the hills of 1920s Kentucky(no offense Kentuckians) where my ancestors are from. This is where I suppose I could adopt a set of beliefs like yours which seem to be modification of traditional ideology, using what sounds appealing to the contemporary crowd. But (assuming) these are just smiley versions of lessons taught from the bible which is wrought with craziness because it was written by dudes 1000s of years ago when it was ok murder someone on the spot for not agreeing with your religious views. We choose what sounds good out of this book but if it was written by God how can it not all be valid? I know these questions sound a bit silly to everyday Christians but when I took a step back and said “wait….it’s all complete bullshit” these questions suddenly make tons of sense.”

        My response:

        What if what I describe isn’t a modification of “traditional ideology?” What if what came out of the hills in the 1920’s was just plain wrong, despite their good intentions? What if the message of Jesus was really as good as what I describe… and it isn’t cherry picked? I am not proposing, by any stretch, that there are not difficult parts of the Bible… I am simply saying that religion has a way of bastardizing and corrupting those things that are simple, pure, and beautiful. In many ways, the journey that you are taking and the questions you are asking are similar to my journey and my questions. I don’t think that life is as simple as waking up one morning and saying yes or no. Is life not the asking, seeking, and knocking that Jesus describes? Are we not better for the journey? Is it any wonder that many of the parables Jesus told were ones about searching and discovering (parables of the treasure, the pearl, the lost sheep, etc.)? It isn’t my job to change your mind about anything or try to close a deal with you, I just want to help guide in the process. I look forward to hearing from you after the podcast.

        peace brother…

        brandon

        Like

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